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Cormorants: Cormorant, Pelagic Cormorant, Red-Faced Cormorant Books LLC

Cormorants: Cormorant, Pelagic Cormorant, Red-Faced Cormorant

Books LLC

Published May 31st 2010
ISBN : 9781156214077
Paperback
38 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Cormorant, Pelagic Cormorant, Red-Faced Cormorant. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 37. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a millionMoreChapters: Cormorant, Pelagic Cormorant, Red-Faced Cormorant. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 37. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: 3-43, see text The bird family Phalacrocoracidae is represented by some 40 species of cormorants and shags. Several different classifications of the family have been proposed recently, and the number of genera is disputed. There is no consistent distinction between cormorants and shags. The names cormorant and shag were originally the common names of the two species of the family found in Great Britain, Phalacrocorax carbo (now referred to by ornithologists as the Great Cormorant) and P. aristotelis (the European Shag). Shag refers to the birds crest, which the British forms of the Great Cormorant lack. As other species were discovered by English-speaking sailors and explorers elsewhere in the world, some were called cormorants and some shags, depending on whether they had crests or not. Sometimes the same species is called a cormorant in one part of the world and a shag in another, e.g., the Great Cormorant is called the Black Shag in New Zealand (the birds found in Australasia have a crest that is absent in European members of the species). Van Tets (1976) proposed to divide the family into two genera and attach the name Cormorant to one and Shag to the other, but this flies in the face of common usage and has not been widely adopted. The scientific genus name is latinized Ancient Greek, from (phalakros, bald) and (korax, raven). This is often thought to refer to the creamy white patch on the cheeks of adult Great Cormorants, or the ornamental white head plumes prominent in Mediterranean birds of this species, but is certainly not a unifying characteristic of cormorants. Cormorant is a contraction derived from Latin corvus marinus, s...More: http://booksllc.net/?id=208318