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Rulers of Pontus: Mithridates Vi of Pontus Books LLC

Rulers of Pontus: Mithridates Vi of Pontus

Books LLC

Published May 31st 2010
ISBN : 9781156249444
Paperback
46 pages
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Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Mithridates VI or Mithradates VI (Greek: ), from Old PersianMorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Mithridates VI or Mithradates VI (Greek: ), from Old Persian Mithradatha, gift of Mithra- b. 134, d. 63 BC, also known as Mithradates the Great (Megas) and Eupator Dionysius. (Either spelling is correct: Mithridates was the Roman Latin version, but Mithradates, the spelling used in Greek inscriptions and Mithradates own coins, is regaining precedence, see eg Oxford Classical Dictionary, 3d ed.) Mithradates Eupator inherited the Pontus in about 119 BC. During his reign, which ended with his death in 63 BC, his Black Sea Empire expanded to include Armenia Minor in northern Anatolia (now in Turkey). Mithradates family was Macdeonian and Persian- he and claimed descent from King Darius the Great and Alexander the Great. Mithradates is remembered as one of Romes most formidable and successful enemies, who engaged three of the most prominent generals of the late Roman Republic in the Mithridatic Wars: Sulla, Lucullus, and Pompey the Great. Mithridates VI was the son of Mithradates V (150 Bn20 Be, who was assassinated while his heir was still a boy. During Eupators minority, supreme power was exercised by his mother, Queen Laodice, who preferred Mithradates younger brother. After regaining his throne, Mithradates imprisoned his mother and brother, where they died (ca. 115 Be. Mithradates first queen was his sister, also named Laodice. Mithridates entertained ambitions of making his state the dominant power in the Black Sea and Anatolia. After he subjugated Colchis, the king of Pontus clashed for supremacy in the Pontic steppe with the Scythian king Palacus. The most important centres of Crimea, Tauric Chersonesus and the Bosporan Kingdom readily surrendered their independence in return for Mithridates promises to protect them again... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=19179497